• The Heated Battle for Healthcare
    August 16, 2017
    By Allyson Paiewonsky, NWHN Communications Intern On a hot June day in D.C, I headed to a rally on Capitol Hill to save healthcare with three other summer interns from the National Women’s Health Network. We saw group of protesters waving signs urging the Senate to protect the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and save Medicaid. As ...
  • What is the Gun Gag Rule, and Why Should it Matter to You?
    July 7, 2017
    By Barbara Gold, MD, FAAP Pediatricians ask lots of questions relevant to children’s health and well-being. Do you have a smoker in the house; is there a swimming pool; do you insist on the use of an infant/toddler car seat or a seat belt? Do you wear a seat belt? Does your child wear a bike ...
  • Trump’s FDA and PenceWorld: The Battles Ahead
    July 7, 2017
    “The president has left his stamp on government in ways that could outlast him, but the NWHN will be there to shine a spotlight.” As I write this, it’s impossible to know what is going to become of Donald Trump, currently mired in controversy. Each day brings new scandal and, with it, the possibility that he ...
  • An NWHN Event to Remember!
    June 20, 2017
    NWHN 2017 Awards Benefit
    Last week, The National Women’s Health Network was proud to host the 10th Annual Barbara Seaman Awards for Activism in Women’s Health. Supporters and members of the National Women’s Health Network celebrated the Network’s recent achievements and recognized the work of two remarkable women, Susan F. Wood and Renee Bracey Sherman. Board Member, Zipatly Mendoza was ...
  • Whose Right to Free Speech? How Pharma is Co-opting the First Amendment for Profit
    June 14, 2017
    By Caila Brander, NWHN Policy Fellow The First Amendment’s protection of free speech is a cornerstone of individual freedom in the United States. However, not all speech is equally protected under the Constitution. Speech that threatens the safety and wellbeing of others can be limited under longstanding legal precedent. Similarly, for most of our nation’s history, ...
  • What You Should Know about Tymlos (Abaloparatide) for Osteoporosis
    May 20, 2017
    By Caila Brander, NWHN Policy Fellow There’s a new kid in town when it comes to osteoporosis drugs. Meet abaloparatide, brand name Tymlos, which was approved by the FDA on April 28, 2017. If you haven’t heard of it yet, you likely will soon, as manufacturer Radius Health is intent on marketing it until it’s also ...
  • Trumpcare and the Return of Rape and Domestic Violence as Pre-existing Conditions
    May 16, 2017
    Recent history demonstrates that even strong state protections may be insufficient in practice to help survivors of rape, sexual assault, or domestic violence. On May 6, the Washington Post published a disconcerting piece denying that the House-passed Trumpcare bill would ultimately lead to discrimination against victims of rape, sexual assault, or domestic violence. Even the headline ...
  • Primary Dysmenorrhea — Menstrual “Cramps” — Matters!
    May 9, 2017
    By Mary Lou Ballweg It was Thanksgiving, late afternoon—I glanced out my window to see a woman on our new neighbor’s patio, bending over, clutching her abdomen, rocking back and forth. She was clearly in agony. I went out and asked if she was in pain, was she OK? She said, “I’ll be OK,” and went ...
  • Young Feminist: Shame Education… I mean SEX education!
    May 9, 2017
    By Whitney Gray My experience with sexual education growing up was very limited. If anything, my attitude toward sex ed was, “I know what sex is, so what else do I need to know?” My middle school inserted sex education into our required health class, and sent a letter home letting parents know they could opt their children ...
  • Clues, Confirmations, and Questions About Hot Flashes
    May 9, 2017
    Women who experience hot flashes for years or even decades after their final menstrual period have one burning (!) question: when will they end? Well, depends on who you ask: in the past, doctors often said hot flashes (officially, menopausal vasomotor symptoms), would last maybe six months to two years. Lately, updated clinical guidelines put ...