Birth Control

Access to safe, effective, and affordable contraception is essential to our health, well-being, and even economic success.

Access to safe, effective, and affordable contraception is essential to our health, well-being, and even economic success. Yet all too often, good information can be hard to find. And decisions made by distant policymakers — some well-intentioned, others not so much — can get in the way. The following fact sheets and articles touch on the health information and policy advocacy knowledge you need to make good choices for your health while becoming a smart activist for contraceptive access.

Health Facts

Online Shopping for Birth Control: An NWHN Guide

By: NWHN Staff

Online access to birth control can be a convenient and easy way to get your preferred method. But like everything else, shopping online for prescription birth control can be confusing if you don’t know what to expect.

Fact Sheet: Phexxi Contraceptive Gel

By: NWHN Staff , ,

Phexxi is a contraceptive gel that works by taking advantage of the vagina’s natural acidity.

Emergency Contraception (EC) is a birth control method used after unprotected sex or when a primary form of contraception fails. It is generally used only in these specific situations and is not advised for use as regular contraception.

Even the safest drugs and medical devices carry some risk of side effects but with good information about the risks and benefits of various birth control methods, you can make an informed decision about what is best for you.

Policy Info

It’s not possible to understand present-day reproductive coercion, or its lasting impact on marginalized communities, without understanding the United States’ long history of sterilization abuse.

Advocating for yourself in the provider’s office
is a crucial part of ensuring that you get the best contraception care for you. Here are a few tips and strategies.

Natural Cycles is a high-tech version of the classic rhythm method (also called natural family planning or the fertility awareness method) in which users track their ovulation cycles in order to avoid pregnancy.

Aggressive promotion of LARCs—or of any method—infringes on reproductive autonomy, and can’t be separated from the broader context of reproductive coercion.

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Online Shopping for Birth Control: An NWHN Guide

By: NWHN Staff , Fact Sheets

Online access to birth control can be a convenient and easy way to get your preferred method. But like everything else, shopping online for prescription birth control can be confusing if you don't know what to expect.

Phexxi is a contraceptive gel that works by taking advantage of the vagina’s natural acidity.

Essure (a permanent non-hormonal, non-surgical birth control method) is no longer available in the U.S. - but many women still have the device in place, and a study of the device, mandated by the FDA is ongoing.

Should we be thrilled that conservatives are embracing over-the-counter access for birth control? When something seems too good to be true, it usually is.

Today, higher-tech methods have eclipsed diaphragms, but the method is being rediscovered by people who are dissatisfied by hormonal options or non-hormonal IUDs. Updated: Feb 10, 2020

When Depo Provera was approved for use in the U.S. in 1992, preliminary research indicated that women who used Depo Provera experienced a loss of bone mineral density (BMD), which might put them at higher risk for osteoporosis and bone...

The History Behind Your Birth Control 

By: Gabriela Salas ,, Deep Dive Articles

Today we’re saying #ThxBirthControl to celebrate the ways that birth control gives people the power to plan, space, and prevent pregnancy, empowering them to determine their own reproductive futures. Recognizing the importance of affordable, safe, and effective contraception in women’s...

Testimony Delivered at the Meeting of the FDA Bone, Reproductive and Urologic Drugs Advisory Committee

Public comments on FDA guidance for the development of new, safe and effective hormonal contraceptive products.

It’s called FEMM and you don’t want it anywhere near your personal life.