Women’s Health Initiative (WHI)

What Options Are Available to Manage Hot Flashes?

By Shaniqua Seth | May 11, 2017 | Comments Off on What Options Are Available to Manage Hot Flashes?

There are various methods for managing menopausal symptoms. It’s important for women to have comprehensive information about the treatment options available so they can decide which one is best for them.

Clues, Confirmations, and Questions About Hot Flashes

By Rebecca Chalker | May 9, 2017 | Comments Off on Clues, Confirmations, and Questions About Hot Flashes

Women who experience hot flashes for years or even decades after their final menstrual period have one burning (!) question: when will they end?

NWHN Shines a Spotlight on Scott Gottlieb – Why He is Wrong for Women!

By Sarah Christopherson | Apr 4, 2017 | Comments Off on NWHN Shines a Spotlight on Scott Gottlieb – Why He is Wrong for Women!

This Wednesday, the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) will consider the nomination of Dr. Scott Gottlieb to head the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with a floor vote possible at the end of April.

KEEPS on Keeping On

By Adriane Fugh-Berman, MD | Nov 6, 2015 | Comments Off on KEEPS on Keeping On

The myth that menopausal hormone therapy prevents heart attack and dementia should have died a swift death after the definitive results of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) a dozen years ago.  But the concept that hormones might prevent some disease —in some women, somewhere, sometime, somehow — just keeps rising from the grave.

Menopause Hormone Therapy and Heart Disease

By NWHN Staff | Jul 9, 2015 | Comments Off on Menopause Hormone Therapy and Heart Disease

No form of estrogen, or estrogen plus progestin, has been proven to prevent heart disease. Yet millions of women have taken these powerful drugs, encouraged by physicians who believed that hormone therapy prevented heart disease.

Non-Hormonal Alternatives For Menopausal Symptoms

By NWHN Staff | Nov 1, 2014 | Comments Off on Non-Hormonal Alternatives For Menopausal Symptoms

The much-belated Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) data have patently discredited two popular post-Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) theories (the “timing hypothesis” and the “bioidentical Hormone Therapy is better than synthetic Hormone Therapy” argument).

Two Years Too Late? Researchers Announce Hoped-For Results, Stall on Revealing Actual Data

By Cindy Pearson | Nov 1, 2014 | Comments Off on Two Years Too Late? Researchers Announce Hoped-For Results, Stall on Revealing Actual Data

Two years ago, proponents of the “critical period” theory of menopause hormone therapy (HT) told women that HT could improve cognition, and possibly protect their hearts, if treatment began shortly after menopause. Two years later, we’re finding out that these statements weren’t backed up by evidence, contrary to claims made at the time.

Challenging Unproven Medicine and Saving Lives

By Amy Allina | Jul 1, 2012 | Comments Off on Challenging Unproven Medicine and Saving Lives

You would think that the medical establishment would rejoice and celebrate this historic public health achievement: science giving women and their health care providers information that we can use to guide our behavior in a way that dramatically improves our health and saves lives. But, in the case of the WHI, you’d be wrong.

Ghostwritten Articles Helped Sell Hormones

By Charlea T. Massion, MD, and Adriane Fugh-Berman, MD | Nov 26, 2009 | Comments Off on Ghostwritten Articles Helped Sell Hormones

If you or your mother became menopausal between the 1960s and 90s, you know that most women were pressured to take hormones from their first hot flash until their death. A friend joked that all women would be clutching a vial of Premarin on their death-beds. Joking aside, all Network members should be proud to be part of the only national membership organization that consistently opposed estrogen for disease prevention.

Health Care Reform — A Women’s Issue

By NWHN Staff | Jan 1, 2007 | Comments Off on Health Care Reform — A Women’s Issue

Dissatisfaction with the cost and quality of the health care available in the United States is increasing. With the Democratic take-over of Congress in the November elections, there is new interest in changing the health care system, but little agreement on the best alternative for improving access to health care.