Birth Control

When Private Information Isn’t Private

By NWHN Staff | Aug 6, 2019 | Comments Off on When Private Information Isn’t Private

We smartphone owners volunteer countless bits of information into the apps that rule our lives. Do we all carefully read the privacy policy for a new app before clicking the “agree” button? Probably not. Some information is hardly sensitive, from recipe searches to cat videos. Some information, however, is incredibly private: passwords, bank statements, or medical results, and every day more of it becomes digitized. 

The NWHN’s Statement on the Results of the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV trial (ECHO)

By Cindy Pearson | Jun 14, 2019 | Comments Off on The NWHN’s Statement on the Results of the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV trial (ECHO)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Evita Almassi, ealmassi@nwhn.org or (202) 682-6240

Contraception Self-Advocacy

By NWHN Staff | Mar 7, 2019 | Comments Off on Contraception Self-Advocacy

Advocating for yourself in the provider’s office
is a crucial part of ensuring that you get the best contraception care for you. Here are a few tips and strategies.

Let’s Talk About Female Barrier Methods This Valentine’s Day

By NWHN Staff | Feb 13, 2019 | Comments Off on Let’s Talk About Female Barrier Methods This Valentine’s Day

Internal Condom Internal condoms (also known as female condoms) are soft plastic pouches that you can insert into your vagina or anus to protect against pregnancy and STIs. Like external condoms—also  called male condoms—they create a barrier that prevents ejaculation…

Instagram Influencers & the New Obsession with All-Natural: How Companies Sell Food, Exercise, and Now Even Contraceptive Methods as a New Way of Life

By NWHN Staff | Jan 17, 2019 | Comments Off on Instagram Influencers & the New Obsession with All-Natural: How Companies Sell Food, Exercise, and Now Even Contraceptive Methods as a New Way of Life

My peers and I have access to more information about our bodies and our health than ever before, encouraging us to take care of ourselves and make well-informed decisions.

Is the Natural Cycles App an Effective Method of Contraception?

By NWHN Staff | Oct 25, 2018 | Comments Off on Is the Natural Cycles App an Effective Method of Contraception?

Natural Cycles is the first smartphone application (“app”) for contraception cleared by the FDA. It is a high-tech version of the classic rhythm method (also called natural family planning or the fertility awareness method) in which users track their ovulation cycles in order to avoid pregnancy.

Smartphone Contraception: Policy Issues

By NWHN Staff | Oct 25, 2018 | Comments Off on Smartphone Contraception: Policy Issues

Natural Cycles is a high-tech version of the classic rhythm method (also called natural family planning or the fertility awareness method) in which users track their ovulation cycles in order to avoid pregnancy.

Health Facts: Natural Cycles Fertility Awareness App

By NWHN Staff | Oct 24, 2018 | Comments Off on Health Facts: Natural Cycles Fertility Awareness App

Natural Cycles is a high-tech version of the classic rhythm method (also called natural family planning or the fertility awareness method) in which users track their ovulation cycles in order to avoid pregnancy. But an app does not = birth control.

Getting an IUD: How One Size Does Not Fit All

By NWHN Staff | Oct 17, 2018 | Comments Off on Getting an IUD: How One Size Does Not Fit All

In college, getting a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) was in vogue. It seemed like everywhere I went, women were talking about how their IUD had changed their life for the better.

Does Birth Control Cause Abortion?

By Evita Almassi | Sep 14, 2018 | Comments Off on Does Birth Control Cause Abortion?

When asked about his dissent in the Priests for Life case, Brett Kavanaugh said that by filling out a form the employer did not want to be “complicit in the provision of the abortion-inducing drugs.” This rhetoric, conflating contraception and abortion, is used by anti-choice activists to intentionally confuse the issue.